Prospective Students

UTokyo Global Unit Courses

Welcome to the UTokyo GUC website!

The University of Tokyo's "Global Unit Courses" (GUC) provides a great opportunity for students around the world to gain what it is like to study at one of the world's leading universities in East Asia. UTokyo GUC offers a variety of in-person and online courses with cutting-edge contents, taught by faculty members of the University of Tokyo.     UTokyo GUC 2024 Brochure
 
A History and Culture of the Senses
AI for Understanding Human Intelligence
Science of Light
Resource Management, Efficiency and Social Justice
Tissue Engineering and Stem Cell Technologies for Neuroscience
Group Theory and Its Applications

 
Culture, Media and Society in Japan
AI and Social Justice
Dilemmas of Development in Asia
An Introduction to Quantum Biology
Modern Japanese History
Governance for Sustainable Development
Early Language Acquisition
Law in Transnational East Asia
Introduction by TA

*Additional course introduction videos will be added as they become available. Stay tuned for updates!
         
 
UTokyo Global Unit Courses (GUC) 2024 Application Guidelines

Program Schedule

UTokyo GUC 2024 Timetable | Course Options

For the screening results, please refer to the "Application" section below.
 
The application period for the UTokyo GUC 2024 has now closed. 
We greatly appreciate the large number of applications we have received from all of you!


- The selection process is solely based on the documents and information submitted via TAO before the deadline. Documents for the selection process are only accepted through TAO, and TAO closed at 16:00 on Friday, March 15th.

- The GUC Office neither accepts nor considers any documents or information for the selection process if they are sent via means other than TAO until the selection results are announced.

- Please be aware that the screening process for all applications will commence collectively on our end after the application deadline, independent of TAO, based on the information provided via TAO. It is normal for the status on TAO to continue displaying "Application completed" during this period, so there is no need to worry.

--
The deadline for the application is 16:00 Japan Standard Time on Friday, March 15th.
We strongly recommend applying well in advance to allow sufficient time based on the following reasons:
  • After the application deadline, the online application system (TAO) will automatically close, and late submissions cannot be accepted under any circumstances.
  • The GUC Office may not respond to inquiries promptly.
  • The GUC Office will not be responsible for any consequences resulting from applicants' failure to receive, read, and/or reply to messages sent from our office, as well as any malfunctions of networks, PCs, or other devices that may prevent applicants from submitting applications in time.
  • Even if an application is not successfully submitted, the application fee, once paid, will not be refunded.

For the main courses, applicants have the flexibility to select from the list and can choose any number of courses from any terms, as long as there is no time conflict.
Refer to the timetable and course options for double-checking.
Additionally, please note that Japanese Language Courses are exclusively available to students registered for at least one of the main courses mentioned above.

Applications are accepted via TAO (The Admission Office) Online Application System only.
For details, please refer to the "Application" section below.

Application Period: From February 2 to March 15 2024 at 16:00 (Japan Standard Time)
Receive Result of ScreeningApril 15 2024 
Program Fee Payment Deadline: April 15 2024 - April 22 at 16:00 (Japan Standard Time)

Program Period: Mid-June to July  
  • Term 0: Monday, June 10 to Friday, June 14
  • Term 1: Monday, June 17 to Friday, June 28
  • Term 2: Monday, July 01 to Friday, July 12
  • Term 3: Tuesday, July 16 to Friday, July 26


Main Courses: 
Course Code Term Course Title Instructor Number of sessions
(1session=90min)
Global Units
GUC24S121C Term 1 A History and Culture of the Senses Ai HISANO 10 1 (In-person)
GUC24S122C Term 1 International Security of the Asia-Pacific Yee Kuang HENG 10 1 (In-person)
GUC24S131C Term 1 AI for Understanding Human Intelligence Yukie NAGAI 20 1 (In-person)
GUC24S132C Term 1 Science of Light: From Fundamentals to Advanced Technologies Satoshi IWAMOTO 10 1 (In-person)
GUC24S141L Term 1 Resource Management, Efficiency and Social Justice: 
Both Perspectives from Economics and Sociology
Hiroe ISHIHARA 5 0.5 (Online)
GUC24S152C Term 1 Tissue Engineering and Stem Cell Technologies for Neuroscience Yoshiho IKEUCHI 10 1 (In-person)
GUC24S211C Term 2 Group Theory and Its Applications Yukari ITO 10 1 (In-person)
GUC24S231C Term 2 Culture, Media and Society in Japan Yuiko FUJITA 10 1 (In-person)
GUC24S232C Term 2 Design x Health: Creating Ideas for New Futures of Wellbeing Miles PENNINGTON
Yukiko MATSUNAGA
Yasuaki KAKEHI
10 1 (In-person)
GUC24S241C Term 2 AI and Social Justice Yuko ITATSU 10 1 (In-person)
GUC24S251C Term 2 Dilemmas of Development in Asia Jin SATO 10 1 (In-person)
GUC24S311C Term 3 An Introduction to Quantum Biology Jonathan WOODWARD 10 1 (In-person)
GUC24S322C Term 3 Modern Japanese History Michael FACIUS 10 1 (In-person)
GUC24S331C Term 3 Governance for Sustainable Development Naomi AOKI 10 1 (In-person)
GUC24S332C Term 3
Early Language Acquisition: 
How Human Infants Learn Language Within Their Social Environment
Sho TSUJI 10 1 (In-person)
GUC24S342C Term 3 Law in Transnational East Asia Kentaro MATSUBARA 10 1 (In-person)

Japanese Language Courses: 
Course Code Term Course Title Instructor Number of sessions
(1session=90min)
Global Units
GUC24S0J1L Term 0 Survival Japanese (Beginner Level) [Term0] Center for Japanese Language Education 5 0.5 (Online)
GUC24S1J1L Term 1 Level 1 Further Steps (Lower Elementary Level) Center for Japanese Language Education 5 0.5 (Online)
GUC24S1J2L Term 1 Level 2 Further Steps (Upper Elementary Level) Center for Japanese Language Education 5 0.5 (Online)
GUC24S2J1L Term 2 Survival Japanese (Beginner Level) [Term2] Center for Japanese Language Education 5 0.5 (Online)
GUC24S2J2L Term 2 Communication Strategies in Japanese Conversation (Advanced Level) Center for Japanese Language Education 5 0.5 (Online)
GUC24S3J1L Term 3 Level 3 Further Steps (Lower Intermediate Level) Center for Japanese Language Education 5 0.5 (Online)
GUC24S3J2L Term 3 Level 4 Further Steps (Upper Intermediate Level) Center for Japanese Language Education 5 0.5 (Online)

Courses / Delivery method

Main Courses: Term 1
A History and Culture of the Senses (In-person course) Syllabus

I’m a historian of the senses, business, and technology. This course will explore how historical changes altered people’s sensory experiences from the late nineteenth century onward. The senses play an important role in our everyday lives—we interact with other people and understand surrounding environments through touch, sounds, smell, taste, and vision. By looking at the formation and transformation of sensory experience, the course encourages students to understand the senses as a lens to analyze political, economic, and cultural change.


Assoc. Prof. Ai HISANO
International Security of the Asia-Pacific (In-person course) Syllabus

Japan’s 2022 National Security Strategy warned that the country is at a “historical inflection point and in the face of the most severe and complex security environment since the end of WWII”. How can we understand regional security challenges that range from war, “de-risking” and great power competition, to climate change, infectious diseases, and terrorism? This course will analyze key drivers that shape the complex security agenda confronting Japan and Asia, through a combination of theory and practical cases. Each session will encourage interactive student-designed class exercises combined with group discussions and lectures. This course draws from the instructor’s experience teaching international security over twenty years at universities in the United Kingdom, Ireland, Singapore, and Japan. I look forward to vibrant discussions with GUC students on how we can best make sense of an increasingly dangerous world.

Prof. Yee Kuang HENG
AI for Understanding Human Intelligence (In-person course) Syllabus

Where does human intelligence come from? Can we design artificial intelligence (AI) that has human-like intelligence? Although state-of-the-art technologies sometimes outperform human intelligence, their application fields are still limited. An open challenge is to enable AI to acquire various cognitive abilities as humans do.  
My course will teach a unique computational approach called cognitive developmental robotics. We aim to design AI and robots that can learn and develop like children. This approach enables us to uncover the principle of cognitive development as well as to design artificial systems that acquire cognitive abilities. Students who are interested in both artificial and human intelligence are welcome to this course.

Prof. Yukie NAGAI
Science of Light: From Fundamentals to Advanced Technologies (In-person course on Komaba) Syllabus

Light abounds all around us. Without light, we would not be able to enjoy beautiful scenery. To take memorable photographs, we will use a camera, which is an optical instrument. Above all, the information on the web page you are looking at now is delivered to you through optical fibers. As such, optical technologies are indispensable in many aspects of our lives. How much do you know about light? In this course, we will learn the fundamental properties of light by doing simple experiments and will study the concept and progress of nanophotonics, which is one of the advanced optical technologies.

Prof. Satoshi IWAMOTO
Resource Management, Efficiency and Social Justice: Both Perspectives from Economics and Sociology (Online course) Syllabus

This course addresses the issue of resource management by asking three questions: i) What are common pool resources? ii) For whom are common pool resources important? iii) How can we effectively manage common pool resources? Resource management is often considered a local issue as they are managed by local communities and stakeholders; however, it is also a global issue, as resource management impacts biodiversity and the ecosystems which is critical for us to stay in the planetary boundaries. One of the key difficulties in designing policies for biodiversity and ecosystems stems from this locality in resource management, especially compared to climate change mitigation and global warming. This lecture, by focusing on resource management at a local level, seeks to reveal some of the cutting edge policy on biodiversity conservation and ecosystem management.
 

Assoc. Prof. Hiroe ISHIHARA
Tissue Engineering and Stem Cell Technologies for Neuroscience (In-person course on Komaba) Syllabus

Can we build a brain-like tissue in the near future? This introductory course invites you to explore the exciting realm of tissue engineering and stem cell technologies in neuroscience, tailored for students at the early stages of their scientific training. We will delve into the fundamentals of neural tissue engineering and stem cell biology, uncovering how these disciplines converge to advance our understanding of the brain. Engaging lectures and interactive discussions will guide you through the latest research, bioengineering strategies, and ethical considerations in neuroengineering. This course offers a unique glimpse into the potential future of neuroscience, making it an ideal starting point for students keen on exploring the frontiers of brain science and regenerative medicine.
 

Assoc. Prof. Yoshiho  IKEUCHI
 
Main Courses: Term 2
Group Theory and Its Applications (In-person course) Syllabus

I am a Professor at the Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, specializing in algebraic geometry. A group is a mathematical concept used to describe symmetry in various fields such as mathematics, physics, and chemistry. It also plays a role in the arts. In this course, we will explore fundamental concepts of group theory and examine their properties through exercises. Additionally, we'll conclude by applying group theory to create your own artwork. While this is a foundational mathematics course, a basic understanding of linear algebra is recommended.

Prof. Yukari ITO
Culture, Media and Society in Japan (In-person course) Syllabus

I am an ethnographer. In Japan, we can observe many interesting social and cultural phenomena. Some of these may be “unique,” while others show patterns similar to those in other countries. It is intriguing to visit these sites, observe, and analyze them. In this course, the first half provides an overview of the situations related to gender, race, ethnicity, and class in Japanese society. Then, the latter half focuses on digital media, popular culture, and global flows, which are increasingly influential in contemporary society. 

Assoc. Prof. Yuiko FUJITA
Design x Health: Creating Ideas for New Futures of Wellbeing (In-person course on Komaba) Syllabus

This is an introduction to the design process. It is a series of workshops where participants can try the basics of design from research, creating ideas through to material experimentation, prototyping and review. We approach this from the perspective of innovation and future thinking - so the emphasis is on new ideas (and not just form-making - as in a more traditional design class) The theme is new futures of wellbeing – teams will be creating ideas for new types of experimental products or services that are related to healthcare.

Prof. Miles PENNINGTON

Prof. Yukiko MATSUNAGA

Prof. Yasuaki KAKEHI
AI and Social Justice (In-person course) Syllabus

My teaching and research at the University of Tokyo has been motivated on the inclusion of minorities in society, whether the marginalization is due to their race, class, gender, linguistic ability or otherwise. I am very excited to be thinking about artificial intelligence with the GUC participants, particularly about how this technology can be examined using the lens of social justice. By welcoming students from various parts of the world, I believe we will be able to see just how varied our understandings are when it comes to our concerns about AI and how it can be used for social justice.

Prof. Yuko ITATSU
Dilemmas of Development in Asia (In-person course) Syllabus

I have been teaching subjects related to the environment and development in the context of Asia for the past 20 years. And it remains an exciting field, especially examining how our knowledge can be mobilized to address real world problems, and how Japan and Asia have unique experiences to share with the world. I plan to conduct an interactive class that challenges your basic assumptions about what “development” is or should be. Cases will be drawn from my field experience in Thailand, Laos and Cambodia along with Japan. Looking forward to meeting you all!

Prof. Jin SATO

Main Courses: Term 3
An Introduction to Quantum Biology (In-person course) Syllabus

The development of the theory of quantum mechanics in the early 20th Century caused a paradigm shift in our understanding of physics and chemistry, yet our theories of biology remain grounded in the ideas of classical physics. Quantum Biology considers how quantum phenomena can afford biology abilities beyond the limitations of classical physics. In this course, we will look at the key features of quantum mechanics and the possibilities they offer biology. We then focus on the particular case of the remarkable ability of some animals to sense the earth’s magnetic field and exploit it for navigation. 

Prof. Jonathan WOODWARD
Modern Japanese History (In-person course) Syllabus

History is not just about the past, and it’s definitely not just about memorizing dates and names. History tries to understand how and why societies change and tells stories about the lives of other human beings. As such, it’s very useful for understanding yourself and the contemporary world on a deeper level, and it’s endlessly fascinating for the window it offers into the experience of those that came before us. Japanese modern history is both rich in its own right, and a great case study to think about how what is often called modernity, for better or worse, has shaped our world. Join me in this course and let’s explore together!
Assoc. Prof. Michael FACIUS
Governance for Sustainable Development (In-person course) Syllabus

As a faculty member of the Graduate School of Public Policy, I teach on topics related to public management. This Global Unit Course will focus on governance – the structure and process of making and implementing decisions concerning public policies – and will elucidate how the choice of governance makes a difference in the progress towards sustainable development. Combining lectures and case-based exercises, the course offers a platform for students to critically engage in debates and exchange ideas about how various modes of governance ought to be designed for our societies and to consider their merits, drawbacks, and unintended consequences.

Assoc. Prof. Naomi AOKI
Early Language Acquisition: How Human Infants Learn Language Within Their Social Environment (In-person course) Syllabus
 
Children learn language all around the world, no matter what linguistic or cultural background they are born into. In this course, we will tackle questions such as: Do babies really learn in the womb? Why is it so hard for speakers from some languages to distinguish sounds like “l” and “r”? How should we talk to bilingual children? We will also learn about early language impairments, the central role of the social environment for learning, and what lessons artificial intelligence can draw from baby studies. Understanding the mechanisms behind their learning is of high societal relevance, since early language skills are the single best predictor for later academic success. In my lab, drawing on observational, experimental, and interventional methods, we focus on the role of the linguistic environment and social context for advancing learning.

Asst. Prof. Sho TSUJI
Law in Transnational East Asia (In-person course) Syllabus

This course is for anyone interested in how such an internally diverse region as East Asia became a somewhat coherent region in the past, and how it might relate to the rest of the world in the future. Tokyo is one of the best places in the world to study East Asian cultures and societies (I would argue the best, but of course I’m biased). My area of expertise is in the Legal History and Comparative Law involving East Asian societies. After completing my LL.B. in Tokyo and D.Phil. in Oxford, I have held research and teaching posts in Columbia Law School, Hong Kong University, the National University of Singapore, and Yale University. 
The GUC has been providing a wonderful opportunity for students with diverse backgrounds to come together, and to learn from each other. I am excited to participate again this year, especially as it is the second time it will be conducted In-Real-Life. I look forward to learning from the vibrant exchanges myself, and to begin a long-term exchange of ideas and experiences with each one of my students.

Prof. Kentaro MATSUBARA
Japanese Language Courses (Online, synchronous)

*Japanese Language Courses are open only to the students who register for at least one of the main courses above.
The courses will be taught by faculty of Center for Japanese Language Education.

Term 0
・Survival Japanese (Beginner Level) [Term0] Syllabus
Term 1
・Level 1 Further Steps (Lower Elementary Level) Syllabus
・Level 2 Further Steps (Upper Elementary Level) Syllabus
Term 2
・Survival Japanese (Beginner Level) [Term2] Syllabus
・Communication Strategies in Japanese Conversation (Advanced Level) Syllabus
Term 3
・Level 3 Further Steps (Lower Intermediate Level) Syllabus
・Level 4 Further Steps (Upper Intermediate Level) Syllabus
*UTokyo reserves the right to cancel courses for reasons such as insufficient number of registrants. Appropriate refunds will be given in case of cancellation.

Global Unit / Assessment

Students will be rigorously assessed and be given "Global Units" based on their performance and the number of class hours.
​Upon completion of course, a Global Unit Certificate, which may be used to calculate credits for transfer to your home institution, will be issued by the University of Tokyo.

The Global Unit Certificate typically includes the following information:
  • Participant's name
  • Course name
  • Number of Global Units for the course
  • Lecture type (In-person/Online)
  • Instructor's name
  • Course period
  • Grade earned by the participant
  • Number of Global Units earned by the participant
  • Notes ("*1 Global Unit = 90 minutes × 10 / 0.5 Global Unit = 90 minutes × 5", "**System of Grading: S (100-90), A (89-80), B (79-70), C (69-60), D (Fail)")

Contact Hours
・15 hours per 1 Global Unit (90 minute-lecture ×10)
・7.5 hours per 0.5 Global Unit (90 minute-lecture ×5)

*For the syllabus of each course, please refer to the information provided under 'Courses/Delivery Method'.

Eligibility

Yasuda Auditorium
Eligibility
Applicants must be currently (the time of application or the program period) enrolled in a university as a full-time student outside of Japan (undergraduate and graduate).
UTokyo students are also welcome to apply for the program. For more information specific to UTokyo students, please search for 'UTokyo GUC' on the UTAS Bulletin Board* (*accessible only for UTokyo students), where you can find detailed information about the GUC program.

Language Requirement
All UTokyo GUC courses are taught entirely in English (except for Japanese language courses) and no knowledge of Japanese language is required. Although no certificate of English language skills is required, students must possess sufficient language proficiency to complete university-level courses. The expected minimum proficiency level is that of TOEFL iBT 90 or IELTS 6.5.

Fees

Akamon

Application Fee
JPY 5,000
The application fee must be paid during application period by credit card ONLY and is strictly non-refundable.
In the event that an application is not successfully submitted, the application fee, once paid, will not be refunded.
We strongly recommend applying well in advance to allow sufficient time.

There is no application fee for UTokyo students.

Program Fees
・In-person format: JPY 170,000 per Global Unit
・Online format: JPY 30,000 per 0.5 Global Unit
 
The program fee must be paid in full after admission is confirmed in April by credit card ONLY.
Payment Deadline: Mid-April(TBA)
 
Discounts for Students from USTEP Partner Universities
Students currently enrolled in the USTEP partner universities are entitled to a 10 percent discount on the above program fees.
See >> USTEP partner universities list

Application

UTokyo Global Unit Courses (GUC) 2024 - Screening Results.
 
The application period for the UTokyo GUC 2024 has now closed. 
We greatly appreciate the large number of applications we have received from all of you!


Please be aware that the screening process for all applications will commence collectively on our end after the application deadline, independent of TAO, based on the information provided via TAO. It is normal for the status on TAO to continue displaying "Application completed" during this period, so there is no need to worry.

For the schedule, please refer to the GUC website under the "Application" section.
--
The deadline for the application is 16:00 Japan Standard Time on Friday, March 15th.
We strongly recommend applying well in advance to allow sufficient time based on the following reasons:
  • After the application deadline, the online application system (TAO) will automatically close, and late submissions cannot be accepted under any circumstances.
  • The GUC Office may not respond to inquiries promptly.
  • The GUC Office will not be responsible for any consequences resulting from applicants' failure to receive, read, and/or reply to messages sent from our office, as well as any malfunctions of networks, PCs, or other devices that may prevent applicants from submitting applications in time.
  • Even if an application is not successfully submitted, the application fee, once paid, will not be refunded.

Application Period: From February 2 to March 15 2024 at 16:00 (Japan Standard Time)
Receive Result of ScreeningApril 15 2024 
Program Fee Payment DeadlineApril 15 2024 - April 22 at 16:00 (Japan Standard Time)

UTokyo GUC 2024 Terms and Conditions
 
*Usage of Artificial Intelligence*
Preparing your application documents is the first step towards your study at UTokyo. In doing so, you will think about what to study there and imagine what the experience may mean to you. In fact, this is indispensable to a successful UTokyo life. 
The recent development of generative artificial intelligence has made it possible to generate essays with a simple command. However, you should not rely on such technology in preparing your application. Instead, it is important that you write about yourself in your own words.
For the main courses, applicants have the flexibility to select from the list and can choose any number of courses from any terms, as long as there is no time conflict.
Additionally, please note that Japanese Language Courses are exclusively available to students registered for at least one of the main courses mentioned above.

Refer to the timetable and course options for each term to verify time conflicts and select an option with an alphabetical letter based on your course preference per term.

Applications are accepted via TAO (The Admission Office) Online Application System only.

Step1:
Create an account for online application system
 
All applications must be completed through the designated online application system, The Admissions Office (hereinafter referred to as TAO).
To initiate your application, please create an account by clicking on "Account registration."
The account name should match the legal name in the alphabet as written on your passport.
You can create an account at https://admissions-office.net/en/applicant/sign_up
 
Once your account is created, ensure the language is set to English and search the application page for the UTokyo GUC Program.
Click on "Start my application" to obtain your Application ID.
To check your Application ID, click on "Application" in the menu tab.
 
Step 2:
Before proceeding to the application page, please ensure you have the following items ready.
 
▶For General Information
1.Copy of Passport (PDF): Pages displaying the applicant's name and face photo are required.
2.Color ID photo (JPEG): Sized 45mm x 35mm, plain background, taken within the last 3 months.
3.Copy of Student ID (PDF): Side(s) displaying the institution name, the applicant's name and face photo are required.
4.OFFICIAL transcript in English (PDF): The most recent one from the applicant’s home institution.

▶For Course Preferences
  • Refer to the timetable and course options for each term to verify time conflicts and select an option with an alphabetical letter based on your course preference per term.
  • Applicants are required to submit a Statement of Purpose (maximum 300 words) for each course they apply for.
  • Applicants for Japanese Language Courses must complete the Question Sheet provided separately by the Center for Japanese Language Education, which includes the Level Check Test, in addition to the procedure on TAO (online application system).
 
▶For Paying Application Fee
  • Credit Card (Visa/Master/JCB/Amex/Diners)

 
Step 3:
Proceed to the application and make the payment for the application fee using a credit card.

Please be aware that after submitting your application, no further changes can be made for any reason, and the application fee, once paid, will not be refunded.
We highly recommend thoroughly reviewing your application, with special attention to the course(s) you have applied for.

<Note>
  • By creating an account on TAO, you agree to the "Terms of Use" and "Handling of Personal Information" provided by Samadhi Co., Ltd., the service provider for TAO.
  • The GUC Office will not be responsible for any consequences resulting from applicants' failure to receive, read, and/or reply to messages sent from our office, as well as any malfunctions of networks, PCs, or other devices that may prevent applicants from submitting applications in time. Furthermore, in the event that an application is not successfully submitted, the application fee, once paid, will not be refunded. We strongly recommend applying well in advance to allow sufficient time.
  • Please regularly check your registered email and the application status on TAO, as we may contact you regarding your application.
  • Please note that the GUC Office will not be able to provide feedback on screening status and admissions decisions.
 

Staying in Japan

Library
Accommodation
No campus housing is available and students are responsible for arranging their own accommodation.
There are many accommodation options in Tokyo, and past participating students have secured their own accommodation according to their own preferences.

UTokyo GUC courses will be offered on Hongo Campus and also on Komaba Campus (mainly Hongo Campus).
The two campuses are located in the central Tokyo area.
It takes 50-60mins to travel from Hongo Campus to Komaba campus.
 
Access Map to the Campuses
https://www.u-tokyo.ac.jp/en/about/access.html#map
 
The nearest stations to the Hongo Campus are:
  • Todaimae Station (Nanboku line)
  • Hongo-sanchome Station (Marunouchi line)
  • Yushima/Nezu Station (Chiyoda line)
It takes about 10-20 min by Tokyo Metro from Tokyo Station to Hongo-sanchome Station.
It is about 20-30 min walking distance from Ueno Station to Hongo Campus.
 
The nearest station to the Komaba Campus is:
  • Komaba-Todaimae Station (Keio-Inokashira line)
It takes about 3 min by train from Shibuya Station to Komaba-Todaimae Station.
 
Prices vary by hotel. The price for a standard hotel room (with private bathroom) is approximately USD100.
During the summer vacation, the prices tend to be high. There is usually an early-booking discount.


Visa
UTokyo will send supporting documents to students attending in-person course(s) and requiring a Short-Term Stay Visa after confirming payment of the program fees.
Students should confirm whether their nationality is a "Visa National" or a "Non-Visa National" by referring to the following websites.
Students requiring a Visa should apply at the Japanese Embassy or Consulate General in their country of residence on their own. Please note that this process may take several weeks.
 
Visa
https://www.mofa.go.jp/j_info/visit/visa/index.html
Exemption of Visa (Short-Term Stay)
https://www.mofa.go.jp/j_info/visit/visa/short/novisa.html

Student Voices

University of Macau

The course materials were comprehensive, covering every detail, and the teacher's explanations were excellent. Even people without relevant background could gradually understand the course content, so there was no need to worry about not understanding. The classroom atmosphere was also very friendly, with the teacher showing concern for any questions, and classmates helping each other clarify doubts. After class, I would return to the GUC office where volunteers were always present. I learned a lot about Japanese culture there and became good friends with them. I felt very satisfied.
 
University College London

The content of the teacher's lecture was very novel and interesting. Much of the knowledge was new to me, and some of the knowledge changed my one-sided prejudice before. I admire the teacher's humorous way of teaching. I feel that the teacher's knowledge is very profound, and I need to supplement the content of learning is also very much. The teacher's explanation is more organic combination of theory and reality, rather than empty explanation of theoretical concepts. Most of them are combined with our daily feelings and experiences, and then sublimate and refine knowledge through feelings. Moreover, outside the classroom, our interactions did not stop.
 
Nanyang Technological University

The class atmosphere is one of curiosity and my fellow classmates asked questions that I myself was not thinking of. This allowed me to learn more than just what was taught.
 
National University of Singapore

I definitely came away learning new things and had my views/opinions changed during the course.
Class atmosphere was fun and relaxed. It allowed the lecturers and students to feel at ease so if they had any questions, I think most people were comfortable with raising them.
 
The University of Edinburgh

My favorite part of the class was, the answer would be the lecture period. I like the fact that the lecture is based on discussion and the teacher's explanation, because we can communicate with each other and discuss the problems with our classmates, and through the collision of different ideas, it makes each of us broaden and improve our thinking, which is very meaningful in my opinion.
 
Nanjing University

Throughout the University of Tokyo's summer program, the class atmosphere was characterized by a sense of curiosity, collaboration, and intellectual vibrancy. The diverse cohort of participants from different cultures and disciplines created a stimulating environment, fostering the exchange of ideas and perspectives.
 
Fudan University

The inclusive environment within the class fostered a sense of community and encouraged active participation and collaboration among peers from different countries, which not only broadened my sense of perspective and also let me get to know some really good friends. This supportive atmosphere made me feel so comfortable sharing my thoughts and questions and enhanced my motivation to engage in discussions.
 
Seoul National University

I actually doubted whether I could earn something from a two-week course, but it turned out to be the opposite. I feel I learned greater than most of regular courses in my home university.
For the class atmosphere, everybody tried to communicate with each other, and since the students are from various countries, we could learn a lot from each other. It was a great experience to face new worldviews and try to understand each other.
 
University of California, Los Angeles

The instructors were undoubtedly knowledgeable and passionate about the academic fields they were doing research in, and they managed to present the lectures in a very straightforward and concise manner. They were also always welcoming questions, which helped clarify some important concepts. We also were able to participate in real experiments that was being conducted in the labs in utokyo.
 
Johns Hopkins University

The university environment was another highlight. Walking through the sprawling campus, one can't help but be struck by its grandeur and beauty. The open spaces, punctuated by thoughtful landscaping and iconic architecture, not only provided serene spots for reflection and relaxation but also fostered an atmosphere of academic excellence. This environment played a pivotal role in my learning experience, creating a sense of belonging and inspiration. The meticulous attention to detail in maintaining the campus grounds and facilities demonstrates the university's commitment to creating an optimal environment for both academic pursuits and holistic development. The ambiance resonates with the rich history and the contemporary aspirations of the institution, making it a haven for learners from all walks of life.
 
University of St Andrews

I enjoyed a lot by the in-person way of teaching, and the lecture is very informative and encourage students to express their thoughts and communicate with each other, the professors are very encouraging as well, I do not need to feel ashamed for asking wrong question or provide silly answers, the entire atmosphere is fantastic.
 
Humboldt University of Berlin

The class atmosphere at UTokyo was exceptional and greatly contributed to my overall learning experience. The environment was conducive to open discussions and intellectual exploration. Professors encouraged active participation, fostering a culture where students felt comfortable expressing their opinions and asking questions. This dynamic atmosphere promoted a deeper understanding of the subject matter, as diverse viewpoints were shared and debated. The collaborative nature of the classroom allowed me to learn not only from the professors but also from my peers, enriching my perspective and enhancing critical thinking skills. The respectful and engaging class atmosphere was a pivotal factor in my academic growth and made my time at UTokyo truly rewarding.
 

Contact

Yasuda bird's eye view
UTokyo Global Unit Courses (GUC)
International Education Promotion Group, Education and Student Support Department
The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8652 JAPAN

For inquiries regarding GUC, kindly direct them to the following email address:
utokyo-guc.adm(at)gs.mail.u-tokyo.ac.jp *Please change (at) to @

⇒ Certificates and Related Matters for former GUC students
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